Maven

Put all Maven dependency versions in properties

Put all Maven dependency versions in properties

Because security vulnerabilities in third-party software are so common, it is important to manage the versions of your dependencies and to be prepared to upgrade them quickly. For Maven projects, I recommend putting the versions of all your dependencies in the properties section of your pom.xml. Furthermore, for libraries which require multiple dependency entries in pom.xml, this allows you to ensure you use the same version for all of those dependencies.
Publishing a Java Servlet to Azure Website Using Maven

Publishing a Java Servlet to Azure Website Using Maven

This blog post shows how to publish a Java Servlet, encapsulated in a WAR file, to an Azure Web Site using FTP via Maven. The first step will be to generate a simple servlet using Maven: mvn archetype:generate -DgroupId=com.example -DartifactId=hello-world -DarchetypeArtifactId=maven-archetype-webapp This creates a simple, Hello World application in the hello-world directory. We can verify it works by running it in a local servlet container using the instructions found in Supporting mvn jetty:run in Maven applications.
Supporting mvn jetty:run in Maven applications

Supporting mvn jetty:run in Maven applications

When I’m writing a Java servlet using Maven, I find it convenient to be able to run the Java servlet in a local servlet container for testing purposes. This is very easy to do using the Jetty Maven plugin. To add the Jetty Maven plugin to your project, modify pom.xml as follows: <build> <plugins> <plugin> <groupId>org.eclipse.jetty</groupId> <artifactId>jetty-maven-plugin</artifactId> <version>9.2.0.M0</version> </plugin> ... </plugins> </build> You can then run your project in Jetty using the following command: